Monday, 31 December 2012

Entry: lacteal (adj.)


In context:  "...you can see the stars hanging in a kind of lacteal goo..."

Definition: Of or pertaining to milk; consisting of milk. lacteal fever, milk fever.


Other: So long 2012!  Sucker!

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 606

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Sunday, 30 December 2012

Entry: surcease (n.)


In context: "'You can of course view entertainments again and again without surcease on TelEntertainment disks of storage and retrieval.'"

Definition:   The action, or an act, of bringing or coming to an end; (a) cessation, stop; esp. (a) temporary cessation, suspension, or intermission.


Other:

SNOOT score: 2

Page: 600

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Saturday, 29 December 2012

Entry: retromandibular (n.)


In context: "Orin looked back up and away at what seemed to be nothing, feeling at his jaw around the retromandibular's much tinier and more vulnerable throb."

Definition: from the Wikipedia article on the retromandibular vein: The retromandibular vein (temporomaxillary vein, posterior facial vein), formed by the union of the superficial temporal and maxillary veins, descends in the substance of the parotid gland, superficial to the external carotid artery but beneath the facial nerve, between the ramus of the mandible and the sternocleidomastoideus muscle.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 599

Source: Wikipedia

Friday, 28 December 2012

Entry: omnissent (adj.)


In context: "Or omnissent doors at airports and Star Markets that somehow knew you were there and slid open."

Definition: Hopefully Orin means omnsicient (adj.): Esp. of God: all-knowing, having infinite knowledge.

and

Having extensive knowledge, or as much knowledge as possible in a certain field or area; very learned or knowledgeable; knowing.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 599

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Thursday, 27 December 2012

Entry: bully (adj.)


In context: "'Bully.'"

Definition: as an exclamation, esp. in phrase ‘Bully for you!’ = bravo! well done!

also, interestingly:

A term of endearment and familiarity, orig. applied to either sex: sweetheart, darling. Later applied to men only, implying friendly admiration: good friend, fine fellow, ‘gallant’. Often prefixed as a sort of title to the name or designation of the person addressed, as in Shakespeare, ‘bully Bottom’, ‘bully doctor’. Obs. exc. arch.


Other: You know this is going to be an etymology worth reading:

Etymology obscure: possibly < Dutch boel   ‘lover (of either sex)’, also ‘brother’ (Verwijs & Verdam); compare Middle High German buole  , modern German buhle   ‘lover’, earlier also ‘friend, kinsman’. Bailey 1721 has boolie   ‘beloved’ as an ‘old word’. Bully   can hardly be identical with Scots billy n.1 3, brother, but the dialect sense 2   seems to have been influenced by that word. There does not appear to be sufficient reason for supposing that the senses under branch II.   are of distinct etymology: the sense of ‘hired ruffian’ may be a development of that of ‘fine fellow, gallant’ (compare bravo  ); or the notion of ‘lover’ may have given rise to that of ‘protector of a prostitute’, and this to the more general sense. In the popular etymological consciousness the word is perhaps now associated with bull n.1; compare bullock



SNOOT score: 2

Page: 598

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Wednesday, 26 December 2012

Entry: apostrophe (n.)


In context:  "The Moms revealed that if you're not crazy then speaking to someone who isn't there is termed apostrophe and is valid art."

Definition: Rhetoric. A figure of speech, by which a speaker or writer suddenly stops in his discourse, and turns to address pointedly some person or thing, either present or absent; an exclamatory address. (As explained by Quintilian, apostrophe was directed to a person present; modern use has extended it to the absent or dead (who are for the nonce supposed to be present); but it is by no means confined to these, as sometimes erroneously stated.)


Other: I had to include this one - and, as it turns out, Moms is (perhaps) somewhat incorrect.

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 592

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Tuesday, 25 December 2012

Entry: andante (adv.)


In context: "Lenz goes in and out of Green's focus several times within a dozen andante strides..."

Definition: Of musical movement: Moderately slow and distinct


Other: Merry Christmas and happy holidays!

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 585

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Monday, 24 December 2012

Entry: anomic (adj.)


In context: "...Mildred had given him two days of high-volume shit for first sulking antisocially by the keg and then screwing out and abandoning her at seven months gone to a sandy room full of tanly anomic blondes who said catty things about her tattoos..."

Definition: Either from anomie (n.): Absence of accepted social standards or values; the state or condition of an individual or society lacking such standards.

or

anomia (n.): A form of aphasia characterized by inability to recall the names of objects.
 
While the former seems the best fit, I can definitely relate to meet anomic folks at parties in the second sense of the word.
Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 585

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Sunday, 23 December 2012

Entry: intaglioed (v.)


In context: "A nonpeanut M&M box is like intaglioed into the concrete of the sidewalk under Green..."

Definition: To engrave with a sunk pattern or design; to represent or execute in intaglio.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 583

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Saturday, 22 December 2012

Entry: psoriatic (adj.)


In context:  "...with sagging porches and psoriatic paint-jobs or aluminum siding gone carbuncular from violent temperature-swings..."

Definition: Of, relating to, or associated with psoriasis; affected with psoriasis.


Other: This got me wondering how many words in Scrabble (North American version) begin with PS - 267, as it turns out.  See: PSAMMITE, PSCHENT, and a bunch of PSEUDO- words with PSEUDOSCORPION being one of the best.

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 582

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Friday, 21 December 2012

Entry: acclivity (n.)


In context:  "The acclivity is not kind to asphalt-spreader's boots."

Definition: An upward slope (of a hill, etc.); an ascending slope. Also: †steepness (obs.).


Other:

SNOOT score: 2

Page: 582

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Thursday, 20 December 2012

Entry: kalpacs (n.)


In context: "Your picks and hatchets and really big tongs, red knuckles and rimed windows and thin bitter freezer-smell with runny-nosed Poles in plaid coats and kalpacs, your olders ones with a chronic cant to one side from all the time lugging ice." 

Definition: A felt cap of triangular form, worn by Turkīs, Tartars, etc.; also an oriental cap generally.


Other: Here's a picture of a gentleman wearing a kalpac.

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 577

Source: Oxford English Dictionary, Wikipedia   

Wednesday, 19 December 2012

Entry: Mondrian (n.)


In context: "Their route down here is a Mondrian of alleys narrowed to near-defiles from all the dumpsters."

Definition: An abstract geometrical pattern of contrasting colours, resembling a painting by Mondrian, used in testing responses to visual stimuli.

as adjective:
Designating, relating to, or characteristic of the geometrical abstract style of Mondrian's paintings.


Other: Here is the relevant Wikipedia article on Piet Mondrian

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 577

Source: Oxford English Dictionary, Wikipedia   

Entry: jounce (v.)


In context: "...the excessive speed of the northbound bus made it jounce godawfully..."

Definition: intr. To move violently up and down, to fall heavily against something; to bump, bounce, jolt; to go along with a heavy jolting pace.


Other: This is sort of a neat subscript to the entry:

Etymology:  Of obscure origin: it has been compared to jaunce v., which it partly approaches in use, but with which it can scarcely be phonetically connected. Several words in -ounce, as bounce, flounce, pounce, trounce, are of obscure history.

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 576

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Thanks my very good friend L., we're back - hopefully for the long haul. 

Tuesday, 18 December 2012

A bit of bad news: I get to the OED online through a proxy I had access to as a student.  I found out today that my account has expired.  For now, I have no way of connecting to the OED.  I'm trying to find a work-around or to get access via friends. 

Hopefully we'll be back online soon.

Monday, 17 December 2012

Entry: infernous (adj.)


In context: "...the final fiscal eyar that actual maintenance-work had ever been done on the infernous six-lane commuter-ravaged Commonwealth Route 24..."

Definition: A neologism, but clear enough.  From inferno (n.):
  Hell; a place of torment or misery compared to hell; a place likened in some respect to the Inferno of Dante's Divine Comedy.



Other: And here's the etymology, which makes it even clearer:
Etymology:  < Italian inferno < late Latin infernus hell (Ambrose).


SNOOT score: 1

Page: 576

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Sunday, 16 December 2012

Entry: brocade (n.)


In context: "...so unspeakably obese she had to make her own mumus out of brocade drapes and cotton tablecloths..."

Definition: A textile fabric woven with a pattern of raised figures, originally in gold or silver; in later use, any kind of stuff richly wrought or ‘flowered’ with a raised pattern; also a cloth of gold and silver of Indian manufacture.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 575

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Saturday, 15 December 2012

Entry: jacklight (v.)


In context: "'It jacklights him for the whole annular model overall.'"

Definition: jack-light (n.): A light carried in a jack or cresset for hunting or fishing at night.


Other: So here, I think the basic idea is it makes him vulnerable, highlights him uncomfortably, etc.

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 573

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Friday, 14 December 2012

Entry: coprolite (n.)


In context:  "'You've seen the coprolite placque in Tavis's office.'"

Definition: A stony roundish fossil, consisting (or supposed to consist) of the petrified excrement of an animal.

Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 572

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Entry: micturate (v.)


In context: "'After we converse you will conduct me to micturate, please.'"

Definition: intr. To urinate.


Other: If nothing else, there are a few choice usages in the OED.  I can't imagine Cat World makes it in here all that often.

1878   Proc. Royal Soc. 27 466   Micturated. Drooping head on one side.

1987   A. Burgess Little Wilson & Big God i. 25,   I would go into all the bedrooms and micturate in all the chamberpots.

1999   Cat World Aug. 46/1   Antha is micturating on the carpets (i.e. marking with a small volume of concentrated urine from a squatting position).



SNOOT score: 1

Page: 569

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Wednesday, 12 December 2012

Entry: perforce (adv.)


In context: "He tells that one may, perforce, judge the opponent player's VAPS in more detail by the ear than the eye."

Definition: by force of, by dint of, by reason of.

In weakened use: by constraint of circumstances; of necessity, inevitably, unavoidably; as a matter of course.

By the application or threat of physical force or violence; forcibly, violently; by force.

 


Other:

SNOOT score: 3

Page: 568

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Tuesday, 11 December 2012

Entry: exaculates (v.)


In context: "Unless the strain of the constant rituals and fussing itself exaculates the perspiring." 

Definition: Hopefully the last neologism for a while.  I don't even know what to say about this one.  Orin, like Lenz, is an interesting speaker.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 1039

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Monday, 10 December 2012

Entry: traversion (n.)


In context: "Traversion is character, according to Schtitt."

Definition: The action of traversing a geometrical figure.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 1039

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Sunday, 9 December 2012

Entry: dramaturgy (n.)


In context: "'...after The Stork finally couldn't keep a straight face anymore and spilled the beans on NPR radio during a 'Fresh Air' dramaturgy-panel the New Yorker guy dropped from critical sight for like a year and then when he came back he had it in for Himself in a very big way, which is understandable.'"

Definition: Dramatic composition; the dramatic art. 

and

Dramatic or theatrical acting.


Other:

SNOOT score: 2
 
Page: 1038

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Saturday, 8 December 2012

Entry: paraphernalia (n.)

In context:  "...toting paraphernalia for performing cultish ritual referred to in oblique tones only as Propitiating The Infant..."

Definition
Originally: items belonging to a particular person, esp. articles of dress or adornment; trappings, bits and pieces, accoutrements. Subsequently: the miscellaneous items needed for or associated with a particular activity. (In quot. 1731 at sense 2a(a): poetic ornaments.)


and:

Law. With pl. concord. Articles of personal property, esp. clothing and ornaments, which (exceptionally at common law) did not automatically transfer from the property of the wife to the husband by virtue of the marriage. Now hist.

but also:

The items associated with drug-taking and drug-dealing.

and interestingly:

In pl. In South-east Asia and the Philippines, the pieces of equipment or products associated with or necessary for an activity.

Other: Etymology:  < post-classical Latin paraphernalia married woman's property (c1270, 14th cent. in British sources; frequently from 14th cent. in continental sources; also as parafernalia ), use as noun (short for paraphernalia bona ) of neuter plural of paraphernalis paraphernal adj. Compare earlier paraphernal n., paraphonalion n.

SNOOT score: 2

Page: 5

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Friday, 7 December 2012

Entry: repelsive (adj.)

In context: "...a kind of repelsive oversized B-cartridge life thundering around due north of where yrstrul and Green strolled through the urban grid."

Definition: Lenzglish for repulsive (adj.): Having the property of repelling or resisting a person or thing; tending to force back, drive away, etc.; repellent. Sometimes with of or to.

Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 562

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Thursday, 6 December 2012

Entry: ravacious (adj.)

In context: "...the ideas of ravacious herds of feral domesticated housepets and oversized insects not only taking over the abandoned homes of relocated Americans but actually setting up house and keeping them in model repair and impressive equity..."

Definition: Lenzian for rapacious (adj.): Inordinately given to grasping or taking; aggressively greedy; greedily desirous of


Other: Etymology:  < classical Latin rapāci-, rapāx predatory, inordinately greedy ( < rapere to seize (see rape v.2)

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 561

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Wednesday, 5 December 2012

Entry: purportaged (adj.)

In context: "Lenz speculates openly on hwo there are purportaged to be whole packs and herds of feral animals operating in locust-like fashion in the rhythmic lushnees of parts of the Great Concavity..."

Definition: Lenzism for purported (adj.): Professed, alleged.


Other:

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 561

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

Tuesday, 4 December 2012

Entry: kamasupra (n.)

In context: "...devoted their cultic lives to snuffling around trying to get hold of the virtual kamasupra diskette and getting together in dim Wilmington-era venues and talking very obliquely about where and just what the software was and how their snufflings for it were going..."

Definition: We're in the midst of a series of Lenzisms.  This one ought to be Kama Sutra (n.): The title of an ancient Sanskrit treatise on the art of love and sexual techniques; hence used allusively.

Other: As I write this we're 99 hits off of 25,000 which, to be honest, feels like quite the accomplishment.  Thanks for stopping by!

SNOOT score: 1

Page: 560

Source: Oxford English Dictionary